Journal of European Television History and Culture

A Multi-media E-Journal on the past and present of European Television

Journal of European Television History and Culture is the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of European television history and culture. Learn More.


Non-fiction Transmedia

Co-edited by Arnau Gifreu-Castells, Richard Misek and Erwin Verbruggen
PHOTO CREDIT: Gebrüder Beetz Filmproduktion / Artline Films
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Interactive digital media have greatly affected the logics of production, exhibition and reception of non-fiction audiovisual works, leading to the emergence of a new area called “interactive and transmedia non-fiction”. One of its key points is that it can deal with factual material in such a way that it influences and transforms the real world around us. With this issue we aim to offer a scholarly perspective on the emergence of transmedia forms, their technological and aesthetic characteristics, the types of audience engagement they engender, the possibilities they create for engagement with archival content, the technological predecessors that they may or may not have emerged from, and the institutional and creative milieux in which they thrive.

VOLUME 5 (2016) ISSUE 10

TV Formats and Format Research: Theory, methodology, history and new developments

Co-edited by John Ellis, Andrea Esser, and Juan Francisco Gutiérrez Lozano
PHOTO CREDIT: (c) FremantleMedia Spain
TABLE OF CONTENTS

During the last 15 years format research has grown into a notable, distinct field of academic investigation alongside the dramatic expansion of the trade in TV formats.

This special issue of VIEW builds on existing format scholarship to deepen our understanding of the history and the continuing growth of the TV format business from a European perspective.

VOLUME 5 (2016) ISSUE 9

Archive-Based Productions

Co-edited by Claude Mussou and Mette Charis Buchman
PHOTO CREDIT: DR Kulturarvsprojekt and Martin Luckman
TABLE OF CONTENTS

In 1927, when Esfir Schub released her commissioned film The fall of the Romanov Dynasty to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the October Revolution, she hardly knew that her extensive use of film footage and newsreels of the event would mark the invention of a new ‘genre’: the archive-based production or compilation genre. Television has adopted this genre, but audiovisual archives have fuelled a wide array of programmes and genres beyond compilation productions.
Government, business, broadcast and film archives as well as amateur collections and home videos are commonly used to spark memories and re-enact events from the past in various contexts. They are made widely accessible and re-used in traditional broadcast productions or given a second life in digital environments through online circulation.
In this issue of VIEW, scholars, archivists, and other media practitioners consider, highlight and elaborate on the use and re-use of moving image archives in various productions.

VOLUME 4 (2015) ISSUE 8

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